Time to go back to school

Group Hands Holding Letter Back School Concept

Summer hasn’t quite waved goodbye, but as we soak up these last few days in the sun it’s time to plan for the upcoming academic year. Many area students will head back to the classroom this month.

While it’s always sad to see summer vacation come to a close, the start of a new school year is an exciting time. From fall sports to new academic challenges, going back to school can provide a nice change of pace for both students and parents. However, extra expense is one aspect of going back to school that can be stressful for families. Fortunately, there are things you can do to not break the bank with back to school shopping.

To eliminate unnecessary expenses contact your child’s school and request a supply list. Many schools already have supply lists available, which are typically organized via grade level. Supply lists will help you avoid wasting money on items already provided by the school. You will also save money by knowing exactly what to purchase.

Save even more in Ohio by taking advantage of the upcoming Sales Tax Holiday, slated for midnight Friday, Aug. 3-11:59 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. All sales tax will be exempt from purchases of clothing $75 or less along with school supplies and instructional materials for $20 and under. The exemption applies per item, not total transaction. Online and phone orders purchased during the Sales Tax Holiday will be eligible for the exemption as well.

According to the Ohio Department of Taxation, school supplies $20 or less that are eligible for the exemption include the following: binders, book bags, calculators, cellophane tape, blackboard chalk, compasses, composition books, crayons, erasers, folders, glue, paste, highlighters, index cards, index card boxes, legal pads, lunch boxes, markers, notebooks, loose-leaf paper, copy paper, graph paper, tracing paper, manila paper, colored paper, poster board, construction paper, pencil boxes, pencil sharpeners, pencils, pens, protractors, rulers, scissors and writing tablets. For more information on what clothing items qualify, visit https://www.tax.ohio.gov/sales_and_use/salestaxholiday/holidayfaq.aspx.

If you are unable to take advantage of the Sales Tax Holiday, ask area retailers about any upcoming discounts or sales on school supplies. As for clothing, many summer pieces are already marked down as fall and winter clothes have hit the main racks. With school starting in mid-August, your child should be able to wear summer clothes for the first month or so. At the rate younger children outgrow their clothes, consider shopping at consignment shops to save money.

Another expense the new school year brings is added lunch costs. Fortunately many of our area schools offer free lunch programs. Call your child’s school to see if they participate. If your school does not have a free lunch program or if you simply have a picky eater, planning is key to save money on school lunches. Include school lunch costs in your monthly budget. Preparing meals in advance can save both time and money. Involve your child in the process by letting them help pack and choose their food. By involving your kids in lunch planning, it will avoid food going to waste and can be a financial lesson as well. Always check your local grocery store and newspapers for coupons to cut down costs.

Locally, students will return to school the following dates:

  • Mason County Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 15
  • Miami Trace Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 15
  • Washington City Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 15
  • Gallipolis City Schools – Thursday, Aug. 16
  • Eastern Local Schools (Pike) – Thursday, Aug. 16
  • Westfall Schools – Thursday, Aug. 16
  • Western Local Schools – Thursday, Aug. 16
  • Cabell County Schools – Monday, Aug. 20
  • Jackson City Schools – Monday, Aug. 20
  • Southern Local Schools – Monday, Aug. 20
  • Madison-Plains Schools – Monday, Aug. 20
  • Gallia County Schools – Tuesday, Aug. 21
  • Meigs Local Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 22
  • Wellston Local Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 22
  • Oak Hill Union Local Schools – Wednesday, Aug. 22
  • Eastern Local Schools (Meigs) – Thursday, Aug. 23
  • Waverly City Schools – Thursday, Aug. 23

Ohio Valley Bank offers best wishes for another great school year. For information on OVB’s financial literacy programs, visit http://www.ovbc.com or e-mail OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com.

 

 

Fun at the fair

One of the most important parts of summer in our area has arrived: fair season! We’ve got you covered on all the local fair fun in store.

If you missed last week’s Lawrence and Madison County Fairs, there are still plenty of local ones taking place throughout July and August. This week plan a visit to the Fayette and Jackson County Fairs. Both events feature a wide range of family entertainment and fun.

While visiting the Jackson Fair make sure to stop by our OVB 4-H Scholarship booth, which features 2018 scholar Kira Mullins. A graduate of Jackson High School, Mullins plans to attend Ohio Northern University to study political science. She is the daughter of James and Dawn Mullins.

Jackson Fair Kira

Kira Mullins, 2018 OVB Jackson 4-H scholar, poses with the scholarship display at the fair.

Other upcoming area fairs include:

  • Cabell County Fair (W.Va.) – July 23-28

Check out the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth featuring Cabell’s newest scholar, Megan Adkins. She is the daughter of Mike and Della Adkins as well as the sister of 2015 scholar, Faith. Adkins is a graduate of Cabell Midland High School and plans to attend Marshall University to study business. Watch the current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation Friday, July 27 at 6:30 p.m.

  • Pike County Fair – July 30-Aug. 4

Pike County 4-H Scholars will be featured once again at the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth. Kalesie Henderson, our 2018 scholar, is the newest member of the OVB 4-H family. Henderson is the daughter of Marvin and Tina Henderson. She is a graduate of Piketon High School and plans to attend Marshall University to study physical therapy. Watch Henderson and Pike’s current scholars receive their checks at the fair 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 30.

  • Gallia County Fair – July 30-Aug. 4

Don’t miss the Gallia OVB 4-H scholarship booth, featuring current scholars and 2018 recipient, Grace Martin. She is the daughter of Leanna and Rick Martin. She recently graduated from Gallia Academy and plans to attend West Virginia State University to study criminal justice. Watch Martin and current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug 2.

Make sure to follow @OVBTweetsSale on twitter to keep up with our coverage of the fair’s auction on Aug. 3-4.

  • Mason County Fair (W.Va.) – Aug. 6-11

Mason County’s 2018 scholar, Kate Henderson, will be featured on the OVB 4-H Scholarship display. Henderson is the daughter of Jim and Andrea Henderson. She is a graduate of Point Pleasant High School and plans to attend West Virginia University to study neonatal nursing. Watch current scholars receive their checks Tuesday, Aug. 7 prior to the lamb show.

  • Scioto County Fair – Aug. 6-11
  • Ross County Fair – Aug. 6-11
  • Meigs County Fair – Aug. 13-18

Don’t miss the chance to check out OVB’s Meigs 4-H Scholarship booth. This year’s display features 2018 scholar Rachel Kesterson. She is the daughter of Randy and Carolyn Kesterson. A recent graduate of Meigs High School, Kesterson plans to attend Wilmington College to study sports medicine. Don’t miss the scholar check presentation, slated for 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12 following the fair parade.

For more information on fair events, visit your local fair’s website/Facebook page. Have a safe and fun fair season!

 

 

Stay cool with these summer savings

Summer 2018 River

Exploring local parks is a great way to enjoy summer cost-free. Pictured above is Riverfront Park in Point Pleasant, W.Va. This park is a good place to exercise as well as take in nature’s beauty. 

 

After a cold winter and hectic spring, summer is often seen as time to bask in warmer temperatures as well as relax. This summer allow yourself to embrace the season by not breaking the bank.

There are many ways to save money and still have a great summer. The first thing you can do is take advantage of the warmer weather by heading out to your community parks. Parks are typically a free place where the entire family can enjoy various activities as well as exercise together.

Many parks also host various festivals during the summer months. These events are typically low-cost or free. From concerts to children events to plays, area parks are a great place to have fun in the sun. Don’t just stop at parks, spend the summer exploring all your community has to offer. From museums, libraries, theaters, hiking trails to local restaurants and shops, discovering where you live can be an exciting and inexpensive adventure. Summer is prime time for community events, check out this post to see what our local areas have on schedule.

Other ways to enjoy the season without putting stress on your wallet include the following:

  1. Embrace the joy of a staycation. Over the years, more people are choosing to spend their vacation time at home. While travel is fun, it can be a relaxing change of pace as well as a huge money saver to use your vacation time for a week at home. Take the staycation to enjoy your hobbies or find new ones; rest and rejuvenate; catch up on your favorite books/movies; partake in local events; work on house projects; and anything else you’ve wanted to do but just haven’t had the time. Looking for more staycation ideas? We’ve got you covered here.
  2. Take turns hosting dinner parties. Rather than going out with friends host your own meals at each other’s homes. Cooking or grilling out at home is cheaper than going to a restaurant. Dust off some board games and make it a fun evening in.
  3. Participate in a progressive dinner. If you would rather not cook a full meal for everyone, you might enjoy a progressive dinner with friends and neighbors. The way this event works is each household makes a portion of the meal, as in someone hosts appetizers, while another hosts the main course, and then desserts, etc. Along with food, make the evening more enjoyable with games or movies.
  4. Watch movies at home or take advantage of theater discounts. It’s no secret that summer is popular for most blockbuster releases. Unfortunately a trip to the cinema can be quite expensive, especially for a family. From tickets to pricey snacks, repeat trips to the movies end up costing quite a bit. If you really want to see a movie when it’s released, check your local theater for discounts. Most theaters offer some type of discount day, while others may even offer additional savings with family pricing. For other summer movie enjoyment, peruse your streaming services and make it a home theater experience. Grab your microwave popcorn and settle in for an inexpensive evening of fun.
  5. Camp in your backyard. Don’t have time or money to actually go on a camping trip? You can still have a camping adventure with your family from the comfort of your own backyard. Set up a tent or bring out sleeping bags to snooze under the stars. Share campfire ghost stories, make s’mores and enjoy the fun parts of camping without the cost of travel.
  6. Plan a day trip. If you don’t have the time or money to travel far for a summer vacation, see what places you could go to and enjoy in the span of a day. From amusement parks, water parks, zoos and ball games, see what is within range of your family. As always, keep an eye out for any special discounts as well.
  7. Go on a picnic. Summer is the perfect time to enjoy a picnic with your significant other or family. All you need to do is pack a lunch, grab a blanket and you are all set!
  8. Visit or host a yard sale. Instead of spending time shopping at malls, you can save a lot of money by taking advantage of yard sales in your community. Summer tends to be a popular time for these events. If you are looking to earn some extra cash and de-clutter, host your own yard sale. Get the entire family involved as this can also be used as a learning experience to educate children on the value of a dollar.
  9. Cut cable. An easy way to save money this summer is to simply cut your cable services. Many network shows are on hiatus during the summer months. While spending more time outdoors you may find you are watching far less television this summer.

Along with spending less on activities, you can also save money this summer by making a few simple changes at home:

  1. Keep your blinds/curtains closed. In most areas summer equals hot, which also means your air conditioner works harder. Keep your curtains closed to limit the amount of sunlight entering your home and reduce your air conditioner’s workload. According to the US Department of Energy, doing this also can decrease the amount of sun generated heat in your home up to 77 percent.
  2. Fill in air gaps. Checking the sealing of your home and fill in air gaps. This will not only help you in the summer, but should also help your home stay heated this winter.
  3. Cook outside. Not only is summer the perfect time to break out your grill, but it can also be cost effective. Ovens and stoves tend to create more heat within your home, which can put additional stress on air conditioning. Grilling also eliminates the cost of running kitchen appliances.
  4. Hand wash your dishes. Handwashing dishes rather than using your dishwasher can help offset costs that may result from increased air conditioning in the summer. We know life gets busy, so if you need to use your dishwasher only do so when it’s full.
  5. Unplug appliances not in use and turn off lights when you leave a room. These small tasks can reduce energy costs, especially if you find your bills going up during the summer due to increased air conditioning.

Remember if you need help sticking with your summer budget, check out OVB’s Benjamin Tracker. Have a wonderful summer!

 

 

 

 

 

OVB enjoys 4-H fun with annual boot camp class

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4-H campers practice budgeting with candy during OVB Boot Camp.

Summer is in full swing. School is finally out, which means fun in the sun, pool parties, fairs, and of course, 4-H Camp!

As per tradition, Ohio Valley Bank once again participated in Mason County’s 4-H Camp. The bank’s class, OVB Boot Camp, took place at both older and younger 4-H camps. This year’s classes reached 27 campers.

A variety of financial topics was presented in a fun, interactive format during both camps. Campers participated in lessons and games, which included the following:

  1. Basic account types
  2. Basic bank paperwork, including check writing as well as deposits/withdrawals
  3. Interest
  4. Debit vs. Credit
  5. Budgeting

Along with each daily lesson, campers participated in a game where they had to juggle their personal mock portfolio of bank accounts. Each day they drew a Real Life Card, which either required them to pay a bill or provided them with unexpected cash. Campers also had an opportunity during this time to make deposits and withdrawals from their accounts. In addition, campers could choose to give in to temptation and spend their game money on snacks or continue to save. This year’s older camp portfolio winner was Hayley Russell, while Lyndsey Ward took top honors of the younger campers.

On the last day of both camps, all accounts were liquidated. Participants used their play money they earned throughout the week to bid on real prizes at the OVB Boot Camp auction. Prizes included a range of toys and games as well as movies, snacks and gift cards. Campers were able to take home all of the prizes they purchased.

Both older and younger camps did a wonderful job. Many older campers have taken the OVB Boot Camp class every year, while this year’s younger campers were all new to the program. The majority of campers agreed that they learned many valuable financial lessons, which will hopefully help them manage their money well as adults.

Camper Derrick Jackson, who has participated in the OVB Boot Camp Class every year since it was offered in 2006, ages out of 4-H camp this year. To celebrate Jackson’s accomplishments, OVB presented him with a $100 boot camp “buzz buck” with his face on it. The pretend currency was also signed by OVB President and CEO Tom Wiseman.

“During my time in OVB Boot Camp I have learned how to be financially stable in life. I really enjoyed my years in the class and getting to work with Bryna (Butler, OVB vice president corporate communications), Hope (Roush, OVB financial literacy leader) and Tony (Staley, OVB assistant cashier product development/business sales and support).” Jackson said. “I would like to thank everyone at OVB for putting together this class for the youth of Mason County.”

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OVB Boot Camper Derrick Jackson, who has participated in the class since 2006, was presented with a special “buzz buck” for his accomplishments over the years.

 

Many of the campers in both the older and younger classes said the budgeting lesson was their favorite activity.

“I learned about budgeting and managing money in our OVB Boot Camp class. It was a lot of fun. I especially enjoyed the auction at the end of the week. I can’t wait to take this next year,” Russell, older camp winner, said.

Camper Alex Fetty also agreed that he enjoyed learning about budgeting.

“I learned how to earn and spend money. I learned about certificate of deposit and how to deposit money into my checking account. I also learned how to write checks. I think the most important thing I learned was about a budget,” he said.

Camper Jacob Shull also found the budgeting game and lesson informative.

“In this class I learned I truly need to be cautious of my limits. Budgets though they take time to work out are worth it. Thank you OVB for doing this class,” Shull said.

Camper Brynn Roush said that the budgeting lesson made her more aware of how her parents manage their money.

“I learned about what all our parents pay for,” she said. “I learned that your parents have to make good choices about how they spend their money.”

Camper Caitlin Campbell was excited to learn valuable financial lessons as well.

“I learned about the differences between credit and debit. I learned how to budget, what a stock is, and so much more,” Campbell said. “I had a lot of fun playing the (banking) word searches and crossword puzzles because it helped me retain the knowledge about banking better. I think this class was very informative.”

Camper David Kapp said that he chose to take OVB Boot Camp during his week at older camp as he wanted to financially prepare himself for the future.

“Being that I didn’t want to fall into debt I thought that this class would help. I wasn’t disappointed as I learned much,” he added.

Camper Reece Oliver said she learned a lot during her week in OVB Boot Camp.

“This week OVB has taught me a lot about saving money. It has also taught me about using debit and credit cards correctly. We also learned about checks,” she said. She added that she loved OVB as well as getting to use her money she earned on fun prizes, including the cookies she purchased.

Camper Olivia Stanley also said that she enjoyed the boot camp auction as it was very rewarding.

“This week at OVB (Boot Camp) class I learned you can earn interest,” Stanley said. “I learned that you need to save your money and you will be rewarded.”

OVB Boot Camp was created in 2005. For more information or to schedule OVB Boot Camp, contact OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush at 740-578-3452 or e-mail hdroush@ovbc.com.

Community First: soak up local fun this summer

 

Morgan McKinniss - Tribune2 - Mary

The 2017 OVB Muddy Nights Volleyball squad in action. This year’s Muddy Nights Mud Volleyball Tournament will return to the Gallia County Fairgrounds June 16. The event will raise money for the fair relocation project.

 

After a cold winter, summer is finally in full swing. Along with schools on extended break, summer is time for picnics, pool fun and outdoor activities. Locally, this summer is shaping up to be an exciting one.

From festivals to events for the whole family, area residents can make the most of their summer without traveling far. The best part is most community events are free or at little cost, which means you can enjoy summer fun without stretching your wallet.

Many area events kick-off this month, including Bikes & BBQ in Point Pleasant, W.Va. Bikes & BBQ will take place this Saturday, June 9 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. This marks the second year of the event, which will feature select routes for cyclists of all levels as well as a backyard BBQ cook-off. There will also be musical performances.

The Ohio Chautauqua is set for June 12-16 in Gallipolis, Ohio. Ohio Chautauqua programs are a unique mixture of education and entertainment where the lives and legacies of notable characters throughout history are explored. The red and white striped tent in the park is where most of the action, including living history presentations, will take place. Each evening will also begin with live music at 6:30 p.m. and performances to follow at 7:30 p.m. Daytime programs will take place at the Bossard Memorial Library, which include youth activities at 10:30 a.m. and adult programs at 2:30 p.m.

In Huntington, W.Va., families can head to Ritter Park for ‘Shrek the Musical’. The event, presented by the Huntington Area Regional Theater, will host performances at the park’s amphitheater June 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 29, 30 and July 1, 6, 7, and 8. Gates open at 7 p.m.

Also at Ritter Park June 16-17 is Art in the Park. The event will take place from 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Forty artists are set to showcase and sell artwork, including oil, acrylic, pastels, watercolor, woodcarving, pottery, photography and other fine art. Event organizers encourage people to bring their favorite person, pet or photo to match with their favorite artist.

The Muddy Nights Mud Volleyball Tournament will return to the Gallia County fairgrounds Saturday, June 16. Action will begin at 9 a.m. with a series of 2-3 tournaments. The event is a fundraiser for the fair relocation project. To sign-up contact Jennifer Bonzo at 740-821-4660.

On Friday, June 22, from 6-7:30 p.m. Gospel in the Park will take place at the Gallipolis City Park. The event will be held every Friday following, with the exception of July 6.

Movie at the Point will return to Tu-Endie-Wei State Park in Point Pleasant Saturday, June 23. The event will be a double feature with two family-friendly movies to enjoy. Additional movie events are planned for Saturday’s in July, August and September with dates to be announced. For more information contact the Point Pleasant Parks and Recreation committee.

The end of June will mark the start of many area Independence Day celebrations. The annual Point Pleasant Sternwheel Regatta will kick off Thursday, June 28 and run through Saturday, June 30. The event features many activities for children and families. The Teen and Miss Pageants will start the weekend of festive fun at 6 p.m. Thursday on the Riverfront Park stage. Other events on tap for the weekend include performances by Devin Henry and Brown & Gray; a 5K/10K run and kid’s fun run on Main Street; and a parade, slated for 11 a.m. Saturday, June 30. Fireworks will close out the event at 10 p.m.

In Mt. Sterling, Ohio the Community Days Festival is set for June 29-30. The event, which is held at Veteran’s Field, boasts a variety of entertainment, activities and contests for all ages. A parade is also planned. According to the Mt. Sterling Community Days Facebook page, more details and activities will be announced as the event draws closer.

In Gallipolis, the annual River Recreation Festival will take place Tuesday, July 3 and Wednesday, July 4 at the Gallipolis City Park. The festival’s opening ceremony will get things started 9:30 a.m. Tuesday. There will be a variety of events throughout the two-day festival, including gospel music; a talent show; inflatables for kids; and various concessions. Wednesday’s schedule will also feature the Big Buck Country Jamboree from 12-3 p.m. as well as the Rotary Mile at 3:30 p.m. The parade will take place at 4 p.m. Fireworks will close out the festival at 10 p.m.

In Huntington, the DAWG Dazzle is set for Tuesday, July 3 from 5-11:20 p.m. The event, which will take place at Harris Riverfront Park, will feature live music as well as fireworks, slated for 10 p.m.

Independence Day activities are scheduled in Middleport, Ohio. Festivities get underway 3 p.m. July 4 at Dave Diles Park. Along with games, a parade is set for 5 p.m. with entertainment to follow. Fireworks are scheduled for 9:30 p.m.

In Jackson, Ohio, Independence Day events are set for July 4. Many activities will take place at Manpower Park starting at 5 p.m. The 22nd annual Jackson County Freedom Fest 5K Run and Walk is set for 9 a.m. July 4 at Manpower Park as well.

The Bend Area will also celebrate Independence Day with a Fourth of July parade, slated for 11 a.m. Line-up will take place at the Community Center in New Haven, W.Va.

Starting in July, Rhythm on the River will take place in Pomeroy, Ohio. The event is scheduled for every Friday in July. It will feature a series of free concerts at the Riverside Amphitheater. For more information, visit http://www.pomeroyblues.org. Pomeroy also will host the Big Bend Blues Bash. The event will take place July, 27-28 at the Riverside Amphitheatre. There will be a blues competition as well as activities for kids to enjoy.

OVB will host the first annual Ruck Walk 5K on Saturday, July 7 in Gallipolis. The 5K, which will begin 8 a.m. at the Haskins Park shelter, is unique as it is a silent walk to be done as a group. Participants are not required but are encouraged to bring a pack as an effort to grasp what it is like for soldiers who regularly march with 50 pounds of supplies on their backs. Online registration is now open at https://runsignup.com/Race/OH/Gallipolis/TheOhioValleyBank5kRuckWalk. Those who register online by June 22 will receive a commemorative t-shirt. Same-day registration is set for 7 a.m. with opening remarks to follow at 7:45 a.m. All 5K proceeds will benefit the Huntington and Chillicothe VA PTSD clinics.

A unique parade featuring tractors is set for Saturday, July 28, in Point Pleasant. The parade will begin at 9 a.m. The route will both begin and end at the West Virginia State Farm Museum.

On July 30, the Belle of Cincinnati will visit Point Pleasant for the annual dinner cruise on the river. The cruise will run from 7-9:30 p.m. For tickets and more information, contact the Point Pleasant River Museum at 304-674-0144.

County fairs will take place throughout July and August as well. OVB plays an active role in our community fairs. More information about local fairs will be coming soon.

For more information on events in your community, please contact your local tourism center or chamber of commerce.

Have a safe and happy summer, and remember to think Community First as you enjoy fun in the sun!

OVB celebrates Teach Children to Save Day

The key to building financially strong individuals and communities is education at a young age. Many people see financial responsibility as limited to adults, but it’s never too early to teach children how to be money savvy.

In an effort to help children understand the value of a dollar, the American Bankers Association established Teach Children to Save Day, which is being celebrated today. April also serves as Financial Literacy Month. According to the ABA, Teach Children to Save along with the foundation’s other financial education initiatives has reached 9.1 million young people through the commitment of more than 225,000 banker volunteers, including Ohio Valley Bank.

OVB celebrates Teach Children to Save the entirety of spring, and will do program presentations in the fall and winter upon request. Recently OVB took part in a Career Day at Washington Elementary in Gallipolis, Ohio. OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush discussed the different careers in banking as well as stressed the importance of saving. Along with materials provided by the ABA, OVB also uses the campaign as an opportunity to utilize the Centsables Adventures in Saving program, which is a fun, interactive lesson on saving. Topics included in the presentation focus on the following:

  1. Wants vs. needs
  2. Creating a savings plan
  3. Making deposits

Parents are encouraged to share the Teach Children to Save message as well. Both the ABA and OVB offer the following tips to help parents teach their children valuable financial skills:

  1. Set the example by being responsible yourself. This is accomplished by paying your bills on time, being a conscientious spender and an active saver. Remember children often emulate their parents’ personal finance habits.
  2. Talk openly about money with your kids. Communicate your values and experiences with money. Encourage your children to ask you questions, and be prepared to answer them.
  3. Teach them to understand the difference between needs and wants. Discuss the value of saving and budgeting as well as the consequences of not doing so.
  4. Open a savings account for your children. Take them with you to make deposits so they can learn how to be hands-on in their money management. At OVB ask about our Statement Savings account, which does not require a minimum balance for customers ages 18 and under.
  5. Tell your family and friends about your child’s savings goal. This can help your child save money with the cash they receive for special occasions, such as holidays and birthdays.
  6. Encourage kids to use Benjamin Tracker inside OVB NetTeller to keep track of savings goals. It’s a great visual to show the benefits of savings.

To schedule a Teach Children to Save presentation or for more information on OVB’s financial education programs for children and youth, contact Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com. Presentations are currently being scheduled now through December 2018.

OVB moves to VISA debit cards

As many of you may know, Ohio Valley Bank has made the switch to Visa debit cards. Not only does this switch help keep fees lower for customers, but it also provides better security.

If you have not yet received your OVB Visa debit card, no need to panic as these cards are being gradually issued over the next months. Customers should still use their current MasterCard if they have not yet received their Visa. MasterCards will be automatically blocked once the customer activates their new Visa or 30 days after the Visa card is issued if it has not been activated.

OVB assistant vice president, customer support manager, Angie Kinnaird, sat down for a Q&A to clear up any confusion regarding the switch to Visa.

  1. As an OVB customer am I required to do anything to receive my new OVB Visa debit card? No, all customers will receive a new Visa card by or before the end of June.
  2. Will my card number change? Yes, new card numbers will be assigned.
  3. When will I get my new card in the mail? Cards are being distributed randomly through June.
  4. Other than activate my new card is there anything else I need to do? Upon activation, you will need to create a PIN. You can establish the same PIN if you wish to do so or create something new.
  5. Will my account be affected in any way with the card switch? No.

If you are away from home when your new card arrives, there is no need to worry as your MasterCard will continue to work for 30 days after your new Visa is issued.

Each new Visa card will be EMV chip enabled. Along with a new number, the Visa cards will include a new expiration date and CCV. Cardholders with recurring payments tied to their old card will need to notify who they pay and update their information.

Customers who currently have a Community First design card and receive a standard Visa in the mail can visit an OVB branch to get their Community First design back for free. However, the fee is not waived if customers choose a different Community First design than they previously had. This way, the school or charity does not miss out on the donation.

For more information or for assistance in activating your new card, call 1-800-468-6682 or visit any OVB location.