Soak up summer fun at the fair

Summer brings us hot days, pool time, vacations, and barbeques. Another important aspect of our area summer? The county fair, of course! Locally, many fairs have already kicked off, but there are plenty more in store now through August.

2019 Jackson Scholar Pic

Check out our scholarship display at the Jackson Fair, featuring 2019 scholar Annalee Warrens. 

If you missed last week’s Lawrence and Madison County Fairs, plan to visit the Fayette and Jackson County Fairs, both of which are taking place this week. Each of these wonderful events boasts fun and entertainment for all ages.

While visiting the Jackson Fair also make sure to stop by our OVB 4-H Scholarship booth, which features 2019 scholar Annalee Warrens. A graduate of Jackson High School, Warrens plans to attend Ohio State University to become a vocational agriculture teacher. She is the daughter of Jered and Missy Warrens.

Other upcoming area fairs include:

  • Cabell County Fair (W.Va.) – July 22-27

Check out the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth featuring Cabell’s newest scholar, Morgan Christian. She is the daughter of Michael Christian and Carol DeBord. Christian is a graduate of Cabell Midland High School and plans to attend West Virginia University to study biology. Watch the current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation Friday, July 26 at 6:30 p.m.

  • Pike County Fair – July 29-Aug. 3

Pike County 4-H Scholars will be featured once again at the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth. Layne Moorman, our 2019 scholar, is the newest member of the OVB 4-H family. Moorman is the daughter of Michael and Stacy Moorman. She is a graduate of Piketon High School and plans to attend Ohio University to study chemistry. Watch Moorman and Pike’s current scholars receive their checks at the fair 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 29.

  • Gallia County Fair – July 29-Aug. 3

Don’t miss the Gallia OVB 4-H scholarship booth, featuring current scholars and 2019 recipient, Josie Jones. She is the daughter of Vernon and Jodi Jones. She recently graduated from River Valley High School and plans to attend Marshall University to pursue a career as a speech language pathologist. Watch Jones and current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug 1.

  • Mason County Fair (W.Va.) – Aug. 5-10

Mason County’s 2019 scholar, Sarah Deem, will be featured on the OVB 4-H Scholarship display. Deem is the daughter of Deron and Melissa Deem. She is also the sister of 2016 scholar, Katherine. She is a graduate of Point Pleasant High School and plans to attend West Virginia University to study marketing and advertising/public relations. Watch current scholars receive their checks Tuesday, Aug. 6 prior to the lamb show.

  • Athens County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Scioto County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Ross County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Meigs County Fair – Aug. 12-17

Don’t miss the chance to check out OVB’s Meigs 4-H Scholarship booth. This year’s display features 2019 scholar Ciera Older. She is the daughter of Chris and Melissa Lambert. A recent graduate of Meigs High School, Older plans to attend Ohio University to study elementary education. Don’t miss the scholar check presentation, Sunday, Aug. 11 following the fair parade at 7:30 p.m.

For more information on fair events, visit your local fair’s website/Facebook page. Have a safe and fun fair season!

 

OVB Boot Camp brings financial fun to 4-H

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Campers learn how to budget with candy.

Summer and 4-H camp go together like peanut butter and jelly. Ohio Valley Bank was pleased to once again teach a class at Mason County 4-H Camp this year. The class, OVB Boot Camp, was offered at both older and younger camps.

OVB Boot Camp has become a tradition in Mason County 4-H, and several campers returned to enjoy this year’s class. In addition, several new campers participated as well. In total, 21 campers completed the program.

“I really enjoy seeing familiar faces return and choose to take our OVB Boot Camp class each year. It’s nice to see their progress. It’s especially enjoyable when a camper moves up from younger to older camp and continues to take the class. We really get to know many of these kids and it is so much fun seeing them learn and grow,” Hope Roush, OVB financial literacy leader, said. “I also enjoy welcoming new campers into the OVB Boot Camp family. I really like seeing the veteran campers take an active role in helping the first-timers because it again shows me how much they’ve learned.”

OVB Boot Camp covered a variety of financial topics at both camps. Lessons were presented in a fun, interactive format. For example, students had to make financial decisions based on a candy budget. Additional lessons and games included the following:

  1. Basic account types
  2. Basic bank paperwork, including check writing as well deposits/withdrawals
  3. Interest
  4. Debit vs. Credit
  5. Budgeting

Along with each daily lesson, campers participated in a game where they had to juggle a mock portfolio of their bank accounts. Each day they drew a Real Life Card, which either required them to pay a bill or provided them with unexpected cash. Campers also had an opportunity during this time to make deposits and withdrawals from their accounts. In addition, campers could choose to give in to their sweet tooth temptation and spend their money on snacks or continue to save. This year’s older camp portfolio winner was Olivia Stanley, while Audrey Reynolds took top honors at younger camp.

On the final day of both camps all accounts were liquidated. Campers had the opportunity to use their mock money to bid on real prizes at the annual OVB Boot Camp auction. Everyone was able to purchase at least one fun item. Prizes included a range of snacks, toys, games, movies and gift cards. Campers were excited to take home all of their purchased prizes.

“The auction is really fun for our campers, but more importantly it’s where they really see the importance of saving money and making wise budget choices. They quickly learn that the kids who practiced those skills have the advantage as they are able to provide the highest bids for the more popular prizes. It’s another way to really show them the value of money in a semi-real world setting,” Roush said.

Both older and younger campers did a great job this year. Campers showed how much they learned every day with banking trivia and other activities. Camper Molly Fisher has taken the OVB Boot Camp class many times and said that she always learns something new.

“In OVB Boot Camp I learned about investing in the stock market, money market accounts, certificate of deposits and much more. The valuable knowledge I have gained in this class will help me with my future endeavors. This class was very beneficial to me,” she added.

Camper Lyndsey Ward, like Fisher, is another camper who has participated in OVB Boot Camp multiple times. As this was Ward’s first time in older camp, she said she was able to learn even more money management skills.

“I also learned about credit and debit cards. This is my favorite class and I learned the most here,” she added.

Camper Riley Oliver described OVB Boot Camp as a good place to learn the importance of budgeting.

“I learned how to control my money. I learned how to work with banks on loans and other things. I also learned about how interest works with credit cards,” he said.

Camper Kate Henderson agreed that learning about budgeting was important.

“In OVB Boot Camp I learned how to manage my money. I learned the different types of accounts you can have and the rewards and consequences of each. I also learned how to write a check and how to do deposit and withdrawal slips,” she said.

Camper Aiden Wallis said the budgeting game was fun because it made him appreciate his parents.

“I had to think about what my parents spend and pay each month,” he said. “I also learned how to save money and how you need to pay for insurance.”

Credit vs. Debit was an interesting lesson for Camper Cara Russell.

“I’ve learned a lot in OVB Boot Camp. One thing I learned was the difference between debit and credit cards. I also learned some of the downfalls you can encounter with a credit card. This class was really fun and I’m ready to come back again next year,” Russell said.

OVB Boot Camp was created in 2005. To schedule OVB Boot Camp or for more information on the bank’s other financial education programs, contact Roush at 740-578-3452 or e-mail hdroush@ovbc.com.

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OVB BANKit celebrates successful year

Summer vacation is officially in full swing for area youth. Ohio Valley Bank is proud of all local students and teachers for successfully completing another academic year. OVB also congratulates all area students who participated in and completed the OVB BANKit program.

As an effort to continue to promote financial literacy, OVB once again partnered with six area high schools to present their BANKit program, which brings real life banking lessons to the classroom through a fun, interactive format. The program, which was launched in 2010, also works as a game where students compete to win cash prizes. It spans the entirety of the academic year or semester. At the beginning of the school year, students are presented with $100 in “buzz bucks,” the OVB BANKit currency. Students may elect to keep their buzz bucks in cash or place it in mock accounts, which include checking, savings, money market and certificate of deposit. In addition, students can choose to purchase and sell shares of Pseudosoft stock, the fictional OVB BANKit company. The overall goal is to have the highest portfolio total at the end of the school year/semester.

With every OVB BANKit session, which typically occurs on a monthly basis, students have the opportunity to work on their banking and deposit money into their accounts of choice. During this time, the importance of money management is stressed as students are also required to draw a Real Life Card. The Real Life Card may provide unexpected cash or could be a bill, which requires immediate payment.

In addition to the gaming portion, OVB BANKit features a variety of banking topics per session. Topics covered include:

  1. Bank account types
  2. Check writing as well as basic bank paperwork, including deposits and withdrawals
  3. Credit/Credit Scores/Credit Reports
  4. Debit vs. Credit
  5. Budgeting
  6. Identity Theft

OVB BANKit reached students at Gallia Academy High School, River Valley High School and South Gallia High School in Ohio as well as Point Pleasant High School, Wahama High School and the Mason County Career Center in West Virginia. The Mason County Career Center includes students from Point Pleasant and Wahama as well as Hannan High School. Approximately 385 students completed the program this academic year.

Once again, this year’s OVB BANKit program was competitive across the board. Students at all participating schools successfully completed the program, but a few stood out as the overall BANKit game winners. Each school winner received a $50 cash prize as a reward for having the highest portfolio total. Participating classes at each school also competed against one another for a special group prize. In addition, on the final OVB BANKit visit at each school students had a chance to test their knowledge with the Final Review Game. The game, which covered all the financial topics discussed throughout the program, was elimination style that saw one winner from each class taking home a cash prize.

The following students were this school year’s OVB BANKit winners:

  1. River Valley High School (semester one): Ryan Lollathin
  2. River Valley High School (semester two): Michael Cicoff
  3. Mason County Career Center (semester two): Carl Sayre
  4. Gallia Academy High School: Emmanuel Valadez
  5. South Gallia High School: Andrew Small
  6. Point Pleasant High School: Christian Holland
  7. Wahama High School: Brady Bumgarner

Winners of the Final Review Game:

  1. River Valley High School: Brooke Tracewell, Lexi Hogan, Sydnee Runyon
  2. Mason County Career Center: Hannah Blain, Brianna Haga
  3. Gallia Academy High School: Alexis Chapman, Bronson Carter, Justin Wilcoxon, Brooke Johnson
  4. South Gallia High School: Timothy Murphy, Cassadee Stonecipher, Andrew Small
  5. Point Pleasant High School: Blayne Butler, Carson Taylor, Brody Jeffers, Jennifer Williamson
  6. Wahama High School: Chris Courtney, Jacob Lloyd, Brandon Duncan

OVB BANKit is coordinated by OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush. For more information on BANKit and other financial education programs, e-mail hdroush@ovbc.com.

 

 

Students react to OVB shareholders meeting

2019 Annual Meeting reactions

Ohio Valley Banc Corp. welcomed students from South Gallia High School and River Valley High School at their annual shareholder’s meeting.

Ohio Valley Banc Corp. recently held their annual shareholder’s meeting. Community was once again a main focus of this year’s event. As future leaders of our community, this year’s meeting also welcomed students from South Gallia High School and River Valley High School.

Julia Nutter, a recent graduate of River Valley High School, has attended the shareholder’s meeting for the past three years. While she has always been interested in the business aspect, she said that she really enjoyed learning about OVB’s Community First efforts.

“It’s interesting to see how when the bank is successful, the community is successful too,” she said.

Michelle Alderman, a personal finance teacher at River Valley High School, also attended the meeting with Nutter. She described the event as a great opportunity for their students to learn more about their local bank and how it operates.

“All semester long they have been learning about and applying financial literacy skills. Some students even open accounts at OVB and by attending the annual meeting they get to see how the topics they have learned are applied in a real world setting. They learn how their local bank works to be involved and is committed to their local community,” Alderman said. “I always enjoy learning about how OVB is working to improve our local community and putting money back into the counties they serve.”

Jeff Fowler, South Gallia High School American history teacher, echoed Alderman’s thoughts.

“This gives (students) a look at real world business operations at the local and regional level in the banking industry, which reflects governance of any corporation,” he said. “This allows them to see how active a local bank is in their local community not in the sense of just accounts but in the sense of economic growth.”

Chad Bostic, a recent graduate of South Gallia High School, described the event as an opportunity to learn more about the business of bank operations.

“I learned about the personnel of the bank and how the corporation operates itself,” Bostic said. He added that he also enjoyed learning about OVB’s plans for their future and how it will impact the community.

Madison Graves, South Gallia High School sophomore, enjoyed the financial aspect of the shareholders meeting. She said she is interested in accounting and that she enjoyed seeing how the bank makes money.

“I learned all the finances of the bank and thought it was interesting how it works,” she said. “I thought learning about the bank’s community involvement was neat. I never really thought about it before and it makes a lot of sense in how (OVB) views the community.”

Both Fowler and Alderman said they were pleased to bring students to the shareholder’s meeting once again and that they hope to continue doing so in the future. River Valley High School and South Gallia High School are also participating schools in OVB’s BANKit program. For more information on that as well as other financial education programs, contact OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com.

OVB celebrates Financial Literacy Month, TCTS Day

Financial literacy is important for all ages. However, educating children on the importance of making money-smart decisions will prepare them for adulthood. It’s never too early to teach children how to successfully manage their money.

As part of the bank’s financial literacy programs, OVB is celebrating Teach Children to Save Day. OVB has participated in the American Banker’s Association’s Teach Children to Save campaign for several years. According to the ABA, Teach Children to Save along with the foundation’s other financial education initiatives has reached 10.5 million youth through the commitment of many bank volunteers, including OVB.

While Teach Children to Save Day is today, the entire month of April is designated as Financial Literacy Month. OVB continues to celebrate Teach Children to Save all spring and will conduct programs during the fall and winter upon request. On Wednesday, April 17, OVB will present their Adventures in Saving program, featuring The Centsables, at Washington Elementary School in Gallipolis, Ohio. The presentation will be part of the school’s annual career fair, which OVB has also proudly taken part in for several years. Adventures in Saving is a fun, interactive lesson on saving, which perfectly coincides with the Teach Children to Save campaign. Topics included in the presentation focus on the following:

  1. Wants vs. needs
  2. Creating a savings plan
  3. Making deposits
  4. Interest
  5. Budgeting

The ABA encourages parents to take an active role in Teach Children to Save as well. Both the ABA and OVB urge parents to utilize the following tips as they teach their children the importance of making sound financial decisions.

  1. Set an example. By being responsible with your money and showing your children the importance of paying bills on time, setting savings goals, and budgeting, you will help them understand money management. Children often emulate their parents’ habits, which includes their financial well-being.
  2. Make budgeting an open discussion. Talking about money openly with your kids is a great way to communicate your financial values and experiences. Encourage your children to ask questions, and be prepared to answer them.
  3. Show children the differences between needs and wants. Often kids and adults prioritize their wants over their needs. Show your children the value of budgeting by taking care of your needs first as well as making saving a priority.
  4. Open a savings account for your children. Involving your child with banking at an early age can help them be more prepared to handle finances as an adult. Bring them along as you make deposits. Also, ask OVB about our Statement Savings account, which does not require a minimum balance for customers ages 18 and under. It’s never too early to start saving!
  5. Involve friends and family with your child’s new savings goal. It takes a village to raise a child, and having others encourage your kids to save their money will help them realize the importance of doing so. Teach them how to save money they receive for special occasions, such as holidays and birthdays.

To schedule a Teach Children to Save presentation or for more information on OVB’s financial education programs for children and youth, contact OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com. Presentations are currently being scheduled now through December 2019.

Have a happy, budget friendly Valentine’s Day

2019 Valentines Day Post Pic

While many folks joke that Valentine’s Day is nothing more than a scheme for greeting card companies and florists to rake in extra cash, it can still be a day to celebrate those you love. If expense is an issue, there are plenty of ways to enjoy Cupid’s holiday without breaking the bank. To quote the Beetles: “money can’t buy me love.”

Whether you are planning a romantic Valentine’s Day with your sweetie, a family filled day of love, or a fun day with friends, we’ve got you covered. We hope the following ideas can help you make this year’s holiday the best one yet.

  1. Explore your local community. While romantic getaways are great, they can be quite expensive. Instead of racking up debt by going on a vacation, this Valentine’s Day take advantage of your local area. A stroll through the park can be a romantic way to spend the day and won’t cost you a thing. Bonus? It’s a good way to get in exercise and begin a healthy lifestyle together. If that’s not your thing, check out local museums, which typically offer free or low cost entry. You never know what hidden gems you may discover in your own backyard. Also, check your local newspapers or social media groups to see if there are any Valentine’s Day events in your area. Many churches often host Valentine’s Day dinners for families and couples. Local restaurants typically offer Valentine’s Day specials as well.
  2. Take advantage of your OVB Visa Rewards. By using your Scorecard rewards points you can save money and still have the perfect Valentine’s Day with your sweetie. For example, use points to book an overnight romantic getaway. Booking your stay is simple as it can be done directly from the EZCard site.
  3. Put your chef skills to the test. Meals made with love are often the best kind. Dust off your recipe book and cook a special meal for the one you love. If you know what their favorite dish is go with that or try something new that you can both enjoy. Not feeling confident alone in the kitchen? Consider cooking a fun, Valentine’s Day meal together as part of your date. Just make sure to avoid any food fights!
  4. Host a progressive dinner. If cooking an entire meal is too time consuming and you’d rather spend Valentine’s Day with a group of friends, plan a progressive dinner. This works by having each couple/family host a portion of the meal. You travel from house to house enjoying each course from appetizers to dessert. Throw in some board games and this makes for a fun evening out with friends that won’t strain your wallet.
  5. Hit up a matinee. If a classic movie date is your Valentine’s preference, why not save a little money and go for a matinee? Matinees generally are less expensive than evening shows. If you work during the day, perhaps celebrate Valentine’s Day on a weekend afternoon this year. Check your local theaters for any Valentine’s Day deals.
  6. Transform your living room into your personal theatre. If you would prefer to stay in or want to save on movie ticket prices, host a movie night at home. This is a great couple or family activity. Each person can choose their favorite movie to add to the lineup. Make it a full theater experience with some microwave popcorn and candy for all to enjoy.
  7. Go cheesy – literally – by ordering a heart-shaped pizza. An oldie, but a goodie. Don’t have time to spend hours in the kitchen but also don’t want the cost of going out to eat? Order a heart-shaped pizza. Many pizza restaurants have the themed pies available on Valentine’s Day. Its, cute, it’s cheesy, what’s not to love?
  8. Donate blood. This one might come off as a bit creepy, but donating blood is actually a great way to bond as a couple as you help those in need. Donating blood together can be a meaningful experience. Ask your local hospitals or Red Cross centers on how to get started. Bonus? After you donate blood you usually get to indulge in a sweet treat!
  9. Make homemade valentines. Creating your own valentines is something both couples and families can enjoy. Store bought cards can be quite pricey, so why not put more meaning in your cards by making your own? If you aren’t crafty, remember what it was like to make homemade valentines as a child. Make it a fun activity together. Exchanging your valentines can be just as fun as making them.
  10. Enjoy loved ones’ hobbies. What better way to show you care than showing interest in your partner’s hobby? If they enjoy video games, offer to play with them. Maybe they like to paint? If so, sign up for an art class together. While opposites do attract, shared interests can make you grow as a couple.

If you are still puzzled on how to spend this year’s Valentine’s Day, remember if all else fails candy should be on sale Feb. 15! What’s better than discounted chocolate and conversation hearts? We wish you all a wonderful and happy Valentine’s Day.

Fall into the season with festive local events

Autumn has unofficially arrived, and our local communities have a jam-packed schedule of events for all ages to enjoy.

2018 Fall Events Pic 2

The Mothman statue in Point Pleasant will take center stage during this weekend’s annual Mothman Festival.

From fall festivals to exciting local culture, most events are free or low-cost, which can be great for families looking to both have fun and stick to their budgets. First up this weekend a local legend will be celebrated with a variety of events. Yes, it’s officially Mothman Festival time.

The 17th annual festival will take place this Saturday and Sunday, with a special kick-off event 6 p.m. Friday at the Historic State Theater, located on Main Street in Point Pleasant, W.Va. The event will highlight three features from Small Town Monsters. Festival action gets underway 7 a.m. Saturday with the Mothman 5K. Other festival events include live entertainment, guest speakers, and a variety of Mothman/paranormal themed vendors, including artists, authors, merchants, crafts and food trucks. The festival will also host guided bus tours of the TNT area. On Saturday evening, head to the West Virginia State Farm Museum for the Mothman Hayrides. Hayride tickets are $5 each and will be available for purchase Saturday morning at the festival. Check out the Mothman Festival Facebook page for additional details.

Also this weekend, the Appalachian Art Festival will take place at the French Art Colony in Gallipolis, Ohio. The event will be held Saturday from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. with a $5 entry cost. The event is described as a “celebration of the culinary, visual and performing arts of Appalachia.” Many vendors are scheduled to appear and demonstrations are set to take place.

In Jackson, Ohio, you won’t want to miss the Annual Apple Festival, set for Sept. 18-22. The Apple Festival is a staple of the community. According to event organizers, the Jackson Apple Festival currently holds a World Record for the most people bobbing for apples. In addition, the festival holds the title of the largest lighted parade in the state of Ohio. With a full schedule, there is something for everyone in the family to enjoy. The event promises to be filled with fun, food, music, parades, crafts, contests and competitions. Also, be sure to stop by our Jackson Milton Office during the festival parade. We will be hosting special customer appreciation event from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. with free hotdogs, popcorn and something to tempt your sweet tooth. For more information on the festival, visit http://www.jacksonapplefestival.org.

More festival action is set for Sept. 20-22 in Meigs County, Ohio with the Pomeroy Sternwheel Regatta. The event is hosted by the Pomeroy Eagles with the support of the Pomeroy Volunteer Fire Department, Meigs County Historical Society and the Pomeroy Merchants Association. The Jim Sisson Memorial Fire Truck Parade will kick things off 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20. Opening ceremonies will follow at the river front. Headlining entertainment Carl Acuff Jr. Show will then perform from 8-11 p.m. Friday festival events will showcase carriage rides, a history walk through Pomeroy and entertainment featuring Blitzkrieg. On Saturday, a 5K run with the River Rat Racers will jump start the day at 9 a.m. Kayak races on the river are set for 2 p.m. Other festival activities include a chili cook-off, cornhole tournament and a performance by the Riverside Cloggers.

2018 Fall Events Pic 1

OVB Chairman of the Board Jeff Smith presents a check in support of the upcoming Emancipation Celebration in Gallipolis. 

The Emancipation Celebration will return to Gallipolis Sept. 22-23. The weekend, which has been observed in Gallia County continuously since 1863, will feature West Virginia State University President Dr. Anthony Jenkins as its keynote speaker. The event will host a variety of activities, including baseball, sack racing, parades and dance contests. The celebration will get underway at 10 a.m. at the Gallia County Fairgrounds. Bill Jackson with Civil War Troops will hold a raising of the flag ceremony, while the Pledge of Allegiance will be led by the Gallia Sub-District Youth. Kids Fun Day activities are set for 10:30 a.m. In addition, the Wave on Wheels Newport Aquarium will host events from 1-2 p.m. and 2-3 p.m. during the celebration.

Autumn events continue in October starting with the West Virginia Pumpkin Festival in Milton. The event is slated for Oct. 4-7 and will take place at West Virginia Pumpkin Park. The festival, which began in 1986, is one of West Virginia’s largest fests. More than 100 skilled artisans will display crafts and there will be a variety of exhibits and demonstrations, such as blacksmithing, pottery making, quilting and woodworking. There will be live music as well. For more information, visit https://wvpumpkinpark.com/pumpkin-festival/.

Fall fun continues with the Battle Days Festival in Point Pleasant Oct. 5-7. The festival features a variety of historical re-enactments and demonstrations. Activities will take place at Tu-Endie-Wei State Park and Main Street. A parade is set for 11 a.m. Oct. 6. Also on tap Oct. 6-7 in Point Pleasant is the Country Fall Festival. The event, which takes place at the West Virginia State Farm Museum, boasts a variety of fall-themed activities for the whole family to enjoy. From demonstrations to delicious apple butter making, this is an event that will help you get in the autumn spirit.

The Bob Evans Farm Festival will return for the 48th year Oct. 12-14. Open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., the festival is $5 for adults while children ages 5 and under get in free. The event, which is a staple in Rio Grande, Ohio, is truly a family affair with a full schedule of crafts, demonstrations, festive food and activities. There also will be a Kids’ Farmyard Fun area with face painting, a hay bale maze, game tent, kiddie train rides, a corn pile and more. In addition, the weekend promises performances from lumberjacks and chainsaw carvers. Families will be able to meet furry friends from the Columbus Zoo as well. For a full schedule of events, visit http://www.bobevans.com.

In Jackson, check out the Foothills Art Festival, set for Oct. 14-16 at Canter’s Cave Lodge. The annual event is a long standing tradition held within the foothills of Southeastern Ohio and features approximately 100 artists and more than 500 works of art.

On Oct. 27, the Harvest Fest/Tales in the Tavern event will take place in Point Pleasant at Krodel Park’s Fort Randolph. Historical re-enactments are scheduled from 4-8 p.m.  Also Halloween enthusiasts won’t want to miss seeing The Pumpkin House in Kenova, W.Va., which also starts that weekend. The house is a unique fixture of local autumn fun as it is decorated with more than 3,000 carved pumpkins.

For more information on fall events scheduled for your community, contact your area chamber of commerce or tourism center. Be sure to check back here next month as we keep you posted on what Halloween events our area has in store. Remember to think Community First as you enjoy the autumn season!