Soak up summer fun with local events

 

2020 Summer Events Pic

This summer take advantage of our area’s beautiful local parks.

Sunny summer days are officially here. While summer 2020 will go down in history as being quite different, it can still be fun.

The COVID-19 virus came on the scene late winter and has drastically changed our lives. Many folks have adjusted to a “new normal,” which has included things such as distance learning for students and finding new, safe ways to socially interact with friends and family. The virus has impacted several aspects of life, including local events. Some families have even had to cancel their much-anticipated summer vacations.

As disappointing as it is to have so many traditional activities and events canceled this summer, there are still many opportunities to celebrate the season of sunshine right here in our local communities. This summer is the perfect time to embrace taking a staycation. Not only does a staycation help you save money, but it gives you a chance to explore your local area as well as reconnect with your family from the comfort of home. Check out our staycation tips here. If you are looking for some fun educational activities to do with your kids this summer, we’ve got you covered here.

There are still quite a few local festivals and events taking place this summer. All events still on tap will operate under adjusted guidelines as an effort to keep our communities safe and healthy. This Saturday, June 13, the Family Resource Network will host their 27th Fishing Rodeo at Krodel Park in Point Pleasant from 8-11:30 a.m. Registration will take place at 7:30 a.m. A fishing license is not required to participate. Children under 15 must be accompanied by an adult. Event organizers ask folks to not participate if they have a fever, respiratory symptoms, or if they have had suspected exposure to COVID-19. Face masks are recommended and there will be distancing precautions in place. Hand sanitizer also will be available.

Taking place this Saturday in Vinton is the 5th Annual Celebration at Field of Hope, which is a faith-based nonprofit organization that offers facilities and treatment to help people beat drug and alcohol addictions. The celebration will feature a panel of eight speakers, including Ohio Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted and Gallia County Sheriff Matt Champlin. According to Kevin Dennis, Field of Hope CEO, the celebration will feature the grand opening of the organization’s new gymnasium as well as the unveiling of a new nationwide project. A free breakfast will also be provided. Social distancing will be in place at the celebration.

In Gallipolis, the Bossard Memorial Library opened its doors again this month with health restrictions in place. Masks are required to enter the facility, however, there are many remote activities for library patrons to enjoy this summer. The library’s annual Summer Reading Program is now offering a virtual option, which began June 10 and concludes Aug. 10. Participants may pick up their reading log at the library prior to starting the program. The library also said patrons may use their library cards to download audiobooks, eBooks, comics, music, movies and television shows. In addition, the library’s Facebook page has been posting virtual storytelling sessions, which is a great activity to enjoy as a family.

The Mayor’s Night Out Summer Concert series kicked off last Friday at Point Pleasant’s Riverfront Park. The concert series takes place every Friday evening through Aug. 21 from 8-10 p.m. Social distancing measures are in place and concert goers are recommended to wear face masks. Tonight’s concert will feature country music artist Matthew Adam.

July will still offer a variety of Independence Day celebrations. In Racine, the Fourth of July celebration will include a parade, chicken barbecue and fireworks. To comply with health guidelines, there will be no dining area this year. Fireworks are set for 10 p.m. at State Mill Park. Viewers are encouraged to stay in their cars or to stand beside their vehicle to watch. In Middleport, Independence Day activities will be fireworks only. Folks are asked to stay in their cars and/or practice social distancing during the display.

In Mason, Independence Day will begin with a parade at noon. Parade lineup is slated for 11:30 a.m. at Faith Baptist Church with the parade route proceeding to the town fire station. Fireworks information will be announced later. While Point Pleasant’s Liberty Fest activities have been canceled, the event will still offer fireworks at Riverfront Park. Fireworks will begin at 10 p.m. with social distancing measures in place.

Wellston’s 2020 “Celebration of Our Nation” fireworks display will take place Saturday, July 4. Due to virus precautions, there will be no no additional downtown activities. Wellston Main Street officials ask that people watch from their yards or porches and refrain from congregating in large groups downtown. During the display, social distancing guidelines should be observed, such as wearing a face mask and keeping six feet apart.

The River Recreation Festival in Gallipolis, which is an area Fourth of July tradition, has been postponed. According to Chamber President Jenni Swain, the chamber is looking to reschedule the annual event later this summer or early fall.

Other activities this summer include kayak and paddle boat rentals at Krodel Park in Point Pleasant. While some of their activities were canceled, Point Pleasant’s Fort Randolph is now open Fridays and Saturdays from 11-5 p.m. through Sept. 6. Masks are encouraged and social distancing guidelines will be in place for all visitors.

The Mason County Quilt Trail recently released a GPS guide, which is located at www.masoncountytourism.org. The quilt trail covers all of Mason County and features 40 squares and Mail Pouch Barnes. The quilt trail is a fun way to see local art from the safety of your vehicle.

Several other summer events are still in the process of being planned to meet health and safety guidelines. Local fairs will be releasing information soon as well. Check with your county representatives regarding those events.

Looking for other activities? Visit local parks. Our communities feature many great parks. Visiting a park is the perfect opportunity to get some fresh air as well as exercise, which the CDC encourages during this time of uncertainty.

Check this post frequently as additional summer events might be added periodically. Remember to think Community First this summer as you support local businesses and enjoy area events. Have a safe and happy summer!

Summer financial fun

As we wrap a very unconventional academic year, plans are now underway for what could be an unusual summer. The COVID-19 virus has made life different for many people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find ways to enjoy summer vacation.

There are many activities you can do as a family, such as movie and game nights; camping in your backyard; taking neighborhood walks; cooking meals together; working on home projects; and more. While many parents are likely exhausted from distance learning, it is still important to not only continue to teach children valuable lessons but spend quality time together as well. The world is different for all of us, and as things continue to rapidly change one of the best things we can do is enjoy time with our loved ones.

Financial literacy lessons do not have to be boring, in fact there are many fun activities that you can do with your kids. By using project and game formats, some children might not even realize that they are learning something too! As many folks are having to rework their budgets due to the virus, the importance of saving money is more vital than ever. It’s never too early to teach kids how to save their money and plan for the future. Here are some of our recommended financial activities that you can do as a family:

  1. Encourage competition. Sometimes a little sibling rivalry can be a good thing. Create a savings challenge. Urge kids to save their allowance funds as well as money they may receive from holidays and birthdays. Create a stats chart by using a dry erase board. Update the stats on a weekly basis – this visual aid will inspire your kids to keep saving with hopes of winning. As for the winner’s prize, add a bonus to their amount saved. If you are able, match the amount they saved as another incentive. For families with one child, perhaps work with neighbors and/or cousins for the savings competition. Send updated charts via email or have video call in sessions to keep momentum going.
  2. Let the kids decide on dinner. Do your children often complain about their meals? Here is a way they can pick what they want to eat, but with a twist. Provide your children with a “budget” and price various items in your pantry/refrigerator. Once they pick their recipe, they will need to see what ingredients their budget allows for. This not only encourages kids to spend wisely, but also shows them how to not be wasteful. Cook the meal together as a family. If you have leftovers, consider sharing with family and friends, but remember to practice social distancing.
  3. Create a “mock mall”. Put together various items from clothing and shoes to video games, movies, toys, and food. Let your kids use play money to shop. After they make their purchases, go over each item. Determine if each purchase is a want or a need. Discuss the value of the items as you emphasize the importance of spending wisely. For older children, consider giving them a pretend credit card as well, which will teach them to understand the cost of borrowing money.
  4. Plant flowers. Just like plants and flowers need regular maintenance and attention to grow, so does your bank accounts. Planting flowers together will allow you to spend quality time outside, while also learning an important financial lesson. Discuss how finances need regular maintenance just like plants. Explain how just like the seeds or initial flowers start small, savings accounts begin small too, but with regular maintenance and care they grow as well. This activity can span the entire length of summer vacation. Bonus? Flowers might just be what you need to brighten both your mood and yard.
  5. Create savings jars. To explain how saving works, this fun craft allows kids to use their artistic creativity. Use four jars to represent four ways to categorize saving: spend, give, grow, and save. Have your children label each jar and then decorate as they please. For more on this activity, check out our video lesson here.
  6. Pizza party game. Generally, most kids love pizza, so this activity is just the thing to keep them happy while learning valuable financial skills. Whether you order pizza or make your own, use the pizza to showcase the basics of budgeting. For example, the pizza represents your family’s monthly income, while each slice represents its own expense category, such as utilities; food costs; taxes; childcare; entertainment; and more. The best part? You can enjoy a family pizza night together afterwards!
  7. Make movie night a learning experience. While movie theaters across the country are currently closed due to COVID-19, you can still demonstrate the cost of entertainment activities by setting up your personal family theater experience. Have each child pick a movie to watch first. From there, create pretend tickets as well as a snack bar featuring delicacies, such as microwave popcorn, soda, and candy. Switch off between yourself and your children when it comes to “working” the home theater. Using play money, have each family member purchase their own ticket and snack item of choice. This game teaches kids the expense of entertainment activities, while also showing how to budget money properly. For example, they might decide to share a bag of popcorn with their siblings, so they have enough left to spring for candy too.
  8. Play with “coin caterpillars”. A popular financial activity for younger children is the coin caterpillar game. It works by using coins to create wiggly lines on a piece of paper. Children are encouraged to draw their caterpillar’s legs and antennae. Once their caterpillar is finished, have children count the coins to determine the value of their new insect friend. This activity not only teaches addition skills, but also helps youngsters differentiate between the types of coins.
  9. Uncover a secret message by determining what is a want and what is a need. Check out our wants vs. needs activity here. Write down the items on the list shown in the video on either a dry erase board or large piece of paper. Have your children play the game by deciding which item is a want and which is a need. As done in the video, circle the first letter of the items that are wants. Once finished, reveal the secret message!
  10. Show the importance of giving back. We strive to make Community First our focus at OVB. We encourage our neighbors to apply that mission to their daily lives as well, which will ultimately make us a stronger community. The importance of community is stronger than ever. It is never too soon to share with your children the importance of giving back. While in-person volunteering may not be available, there are many other things you can do while still practicing social distancing. For example, use your quarantine time to go through each family member’s closet and select items for donation. Search your pantry to gather items to donate. Many food banks are still in need of donations. Make sure to call your donation place of choice before going to see what their drop-off procedures are.

These are just some of the many ways to help kids grasp the concept of saving, budgeting, and managing their money wisely, while also having fun as a family. Another step you can take to teach your children about finances is to include them in family money discussions. For example, show them how you budget for monthly expense. Also, consider opening a savings account for your child. You can easily open a student savings account online at www.ovbc.com.

For more financial literacy video lessons and activities, check out our new Virtual Classroom. Remember to visit frequently as we plan to continue adding new content.

Celebrate Teach Children to Save all month

Pink piggy bank with a dollar bill in the slot

Spring is starting off a bit different for all of us, but with kids at home doing online schoolwork, now is the perfect time to teach your children important financial lessons. Ohio Valley Bank is once again celebrating the American Bankers Association’s Teach Children to Save campaign.

While Teach Children to Save day is set for April 24, OVB encourages families to embrace the campaign all month. It’s never too early to teach children how to successfully manage their money. According to the ABA, Teach Children to Save has helped reach 10.5 million students through the commitment of more than 260,000 banker volunteers.

“Even though schools are currently closed due to COVID-19, we are working on other ways to spread the Teach Children to Save message to area youth. Since we can’t come to the schools right now, we hope to bring the valuable lessons from this program to your child’s living room,” Hope Roush, OVB Financial Literacy Leader said. “I encourage everyone to take the ideas from this blog post and apply it to your home school activities. Teaching children valuable financial skills is important now more than ever.”

OVB Vice President, Corporate Communications Bryna Butler echoed Roush’s thoughts regarding Teach Children to Save.

“Youth outreach a very special part of our Community First mission. These are the next leaders of our communities, and as the community bank, it is our responsibility to prepare them for the future. Teach Children to Save is a great way to reinforce the importance of saving and investing as part of overall financial wellness,” she said.

As many families are reworking their budgets due to the uncertainty of the world, consider involving your children in the process. By letting them see exactly how much things cost and how a budget works, you are providing them with the tools they need to carry into adulthood. Taking an active role in the Teach Children to Save campaign by teaching your children to make sound financial decisions will make our communities even stronger.

The following tips are ways you can incorporate the Teach Children to Save message at home with your families:

  • Set an example. Be responsible with your money. Show your children the importance of paying bills on time, setting savings goals, and budgeting as this will help your children understand money management. Remember children often emulate their parents’ habits, which includes their financial well-being.
  • Be open when it comes to your budget. As mentioned above, by involving your children into your budget planning, you will help them see hands-on what it takes to manage everyday expenses. Encourage your children to ask questions and be prepared to answer them. This list from the ABA offers eight ways to talk openly with your children about money.
  • Open a savings account for your child. Involving your children in the banking process at an early age can help prepare them to handle finances as an adult. OVB’s Statement Savings account, which does not require a minimum balance, is for ages 18 and under. Savings accounts can be opened online. Also, show your children how you manage money online through services such as NetTeller or Mobile Deposit. Many kids are already very tech savvy and showing them how you can easily bank online is a great way to maintain their attention. When stay-at-home orders are lifted and it’s deemed safe, bring your kids along with you on your next trip to the bank.
  • Demonstrate the differences between wants and needs. One of the major lessons in the Teach Children to Save campaign is learning to decipher between what is a want and a need. Children and even adults sometimes easily confuse the two prioritizing their wants over their needs, which can lead to bad financial decisions. Show your children items that are considered a need, such as food, and compare it to items that are wants, such as their newest video game. You can even make a game out of it: explore your house and point to different items where you ask your children to determine what is a need and what is a want. This could be both a fun and educational quarantine game for the whole family!
  • Help your child create a savings plan. Ask your child to think about something they really want. After costs are determined, create a plan to help them save for their item of choice. On the plan make a space where your child can keep track of the money earned toward their goal.
  • Involve family and friends in your child’s savings goal. By having others encourage your child’s saving goal this will only further solidify the importance of saving money. Also, teach your children how to save the money they receive from special occasions, such as birthdays and holidays.
  • Put the literacy in financial literacy. Encourage your children to read books that cover various money concepts. Not only will this help their reading comprehension, but they will be smart money managers, too. Check out the ABA’s reading recommendations here.

For more information on OVB’s financial education programs, contact Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com. In addition, visit https://www.ovbc.com/kids/centsables  to explore OVB’s superhero team, The Centsables. The Centsables website offers a variety of financial games and activities for children as well as information for parents.

 

 

Area schools offer lunch deliveries

The world is certainly a different place than it was two weeks ago. The COVID-19 virus has caused many businesses to temporarily close. Ohio and West Virginia will be under a “stay at home” order effective Tuesday evening. These measures to keep our communities safe and healthy has also resulted in school closures for both Ohio and West Virginia.

While school closures are a necessary step to keep people safe and practice social distancing, it also has created some difficulties for parents and students. Many of our area students rely on school to not only provide an education, but also to give them a meal each day. Several of our area students are on free lunch programs. They rely on these programs. To make sure no student goes hungry, our area school districts have stepped up to the plate with lunch pick-ups and/or delivery programs.

School lunches are considered an essential service and will still be provided. We commend our local schools for stepping up to the plate and taking care of our kids. The following school districts are providing meals:

  • Gallipolis City Schools – Gallipolis City Schools will provide pick-up and/or delivery on Fridays. Each student will receive five days’ worth of meals. As of today, students were provided with enough food to get them through until this Friday. Pick-up and delivery times will take place from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Meals will be available for pick-up at Gallia Academy Middle School. For more information and to schedule delivery, call 740-446-3214 ext. 7.
  • Gallia County Local Schools – Delivery meals to students in the Gallia County Local School District is now available. Friday delivery will include five meals and a snack pack. To schedule delivery, call The Education Connection at 740-441-3052.
  • Meigs Local Schools – Meigs Local Schools will offer pick-up locations at Meigs Elementary and Meigs Middle School. The sites are set up as drive-thru service in the back of both buildings. Both locations will offer this service on Wednesdays from 10 a.m.-noon. Each family will receive five meals per child.
  • Jackson City School District – The Jackson City School District will provide pick-up meals only at the entrance of the district’s three elementary schools as well as the entrance at the Jackson Middle School gymnasium from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. For more information, call 740-286-6642.
  • Oak Hill Schools – Oak Hill Schools will offer meal delivery and pick-up meals Monday-Friday from 10 a.m.-noon. Delivery will take place on the normal bus routes. For more information, call the Oak Hill Board Office between the hours of 10 a.m.-noon at 740-682-7595.
  • Scioto Valley Local School District – The Scioto Valley Local District will distribute food for district families. Pick-up at Piketon High School and Jasper Elementary will be available as well from 10 a.m.-noon on Tuesdays and Fridays. To arrange services, please call 740-289-4117. Be sure to leave a message with your name, address, phone number, and number of children per household.
  • Mason County Schools – Mason County Schools have been offering meal delivery and pick-up at schools across the county. To check supply and for more information, call your child’s school.
  • Cabell County Schools – Cabell County Schools will continue to offer meal delivery for students. “Grab & Go” student meal sites are located across the county, which provide free bagged meals for any child 18 and under. The sites operate Monday-Friday of each week. Please call 304-528-5048 for more information.

If you do not see your child’s school district on this list, we urge you to contact their school/board office for additional information. From all of us at OVB, we thank all schools, teachers, and volunteers who are making this service possible for area children. Our best defense to combat this virus is to work together. By thinking Community First, we will get through this.

 

Focus on Community First

The world is a much different place today than it was a week ago. Even an hour ago. As this post is published, there could even be more changes. However, one thing that remains steadfast is Ohio Valley Bank’s commitment to their Community First mission.

OVB prides itself on being an independent, community bank. This is made possible thanks to the support of our local areas. As the world adjusts to a “new normal” in response to the COVID-19 virus, many lives and routines are changing as a result. Our communities have felt this affect as both schools in Ohio and West Virginia are closed. In Ohio, restaurants and bars are now limited to drive-thru/carryout options only. Movie theaters have shut their doors as well. While these measures are necessary as public health is the top priority, many businesses are going through a difficult time. Local businesses, especially, could face challenges due to closures and social distancing.

How can you help? In line with the Community First mission, try to shop locally whenever possible. Local grocery stores are still open and are a necessity as many folks find themselves “hunkering down” for the foreseeable future. What else can you do to help our local businesses?

  • Take advantage of carryout options at local restaurants. The food industry is struggling as they have been limited to drive-thru and carryout only. By ordering carryout, you achieve social distancing while also supporting the restaurant and their employees. Take it a step further by ordering several meals, which can be frozen and eaten later.
  • Purchase gift cards from your favorite local shops. Purchasing a gift card from your favorite local restaurant and store can directly help their business. As more businesses close entirely during this trying time, ask about online gift card options. The gift card purchases not only help businesses in the present but can also be used when the shops open back to full capacity in the future.
  • Shop online. If you aren’t sure if your favorite shop has an online option, give them a call to see about out-of-store purchase availability.
  • Donate supplies. Many businesses that are still open are trying their best to keep customers and staff safe by utilizing additional sanitizing procedures. However, essential items, including hand sanitizer, are becoming difficult to keep in stock. If you have sanitizer or cleaning products to spare, your donation would surely be appreciated.
  • Send a nice note. It might sound cheesy, but in uncertain times a simple act of kindness can go a long way. Letting your favorite shop know you care is a good way to boost morale. Optimism is needed now more than ever.

In addition to helping businesses, we can assist our communities by making sure local food pantries have plenty of items in stock. Consider donating non-perishable food items to your nearest food bank/pantry. Call for delivery instructions.

At OVB, the health and safety of our community and customers is our top priority. Starting Wednesday, March 18, several of our branches will be operating drive-thru only with extended hours for customer convenience. Existing customers may visit inside lobbies via appointment. For a full list of branch operating hours, visit https://www.ovbc.com/about/locations–hours.

We encourage our valued customers to take advantage of the following non-contact banking channels, including:

  • NetTeller Internet banking. Enroll at https://bit/ly/nettellerovb.
  • OVB Mobile App. Use the NetTeller link to enroll.
  • OVB Line telephone banking. Call 1-888-FONE-OVB (888-366-3682). Make sure to have both your social security number and account numbers ready.
  • Text Message Banking. Located inside NetTeller, click the “text banking” tab for instructions.
  • ATMs. OVB customers have the benefit of surcharge-free transactions at any Moneypass ATM in the nation. Other banks’ fees may apply.

At the end of the day, we are all in this together. By keeping the Community First mission in mind, we will prevail.

 

 

 

Celebrate the season with festive holiday events

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Our very own Tom Wiseman, OVB Chief Executive Officer, poses with Santa at the Mini Bank. Mr. Claus is set to visit several OVB branch locations next month.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. Thanksgiving feasts are being prepped, Christmas trees are adorned with ornaments, and lights are twinkling. That can only mean one thing – it’s officially the holiday season!

As the holiday shopping really gets underway this week with Black Friday sales, we encourage you to think Community First and shop local. Be sure to check out our Holiday Gift Guide, which will be released Friday on the OVB Facebook page, for some great present ideas. Also, don’t forget that Small Business Saturday returns this week.

Along with shopping, there are many area festive events to help you get into the holiday spirit. Tonight, the Gallipolis In Lights will officially begin. The beautiful glowing lights transform the Gallipolis City Park into a winter wonderland. The ceremony to kick-off this year’s Gallipolis In Lights will take place from 5-8 p.m. Local acts will provide entertainment and fireworks are also scheduled. In addition, OVB will present a special surprise during the ceremony. Admission is free and the lights will sparkle through New Year’s.

Also this evening, The Our House museum in Gallipolis will host its annual holiday open house event. Doors open at 5 p.m. The open house is free and will feature refreshments along with a great chance to learn some local history.

In Point Pleasant, Krodel Park is already shining brightly with the annual Christmas Fantasy Light Show. This drive-through celebration features a wide-variety of animated light displays, including West Virginia’s very own Mothman legend. The lights open daily from 6-9 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. Also, in Point Pleasant is the annual Christmas Light Show at the West Virginia State Farm Museum. This event will run from Dec. 6-15.

Area Christmas parades will also get going this weekend. In Meigs County, the Middleport Christmas Parade is slated for this Saturday at 6:30 p.m. The parade will end at The Blakeslee Center, where Santa and the Grinch will be on hand to take photos with children and families. S’mores and hot chocolate will be provided. On Sunday. Dec. 1, The Pomeroy Christmas Parade will begin at 2 p.m. Cabell County will hold the Barboursville Christmas Parade 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5. This year’s theme is “Ugly Christmas Sweater,” and parade line-up will begin at 5 p.m. at the bus barn, located behind Barboursville Middle School. In Mason County, the Christmas Parade and Tree Lighting is set for 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6. The parade will take place on Main Street, while the tree lighting will follow at Gunn Park. The tree lighting will include performances from junior high and high school band members. On Saturday, Dec. 7 the Mason/New Haven Christmas Parade will kick-off at noon. In Gallia County, the Gallipolis Christmas Parade is set for Saturday, Dec. 7 from 1-2:30 p.m. Our very own OVB Christmas Express volunteers will once again participate in this year’s event.

Other festive area must-see events include the Second Annual Trees in the Park in Mason. The event begins this Saturday at the Stewart-Johnson V.F.W./Lottie Jenks Memorial Park. The public is invited to place either an artificial or live decorated tree at the park Saturday through Dec. 7. The trees will remain on display through Christmas. There is no fee to participate, and the trees may be placed in memory or in honor of a loved one or friend.

Check out The Christmas Show! concert Saturday, Dec. 7 at the Ariel Theatre in Gallipolis to help you get into the holiday spirit. The concert will run from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Last year’s show sold out, so contact the Ariel at 740-446-2787 for ticket information.

In Barboursville, check out the First Annual Christmas Bazaar/Craft event this Saturday. The event will take place at the Barboursville Community Center from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Santa will also be in attendance to take pictures with children.

Other area festivities include Christmas on the Frontier at Point Pleasant’s Fort Randolph. The event will take place from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Historical reenactors will be on site to take you back in time for the holidays.

OVB also will host a variety of holiday-themed events at our branches, including the following:

  • Santa at the Mini Bank – On Friday, Dec. 6 Santa will be at our Mini Bank in Gallipolis from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
  • Pictures with Santa – The jolly man in red will also make an appearance at our Bend Area Office on Tuesday, Dec. 10 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Kids are welcome to bring their letters for Santa. Refreshments will be provided.
  • The Polar Express – On Saturday, Dec. 14 our Jackson Pike Office will host this special event from 9-11 a.m., which features breakfast with Santa and crafts.
  • Cookies and Cocoa with Mrs. Claus – On Saturday, Dec. 14 our Milton, W.Va. office will host Mrs. Claus as the guest of honor beginning at 11:45 a.m. In addition to festive treats, she will read the classic poem, The Night Before Christmas.

From all of us at OVB, Happy Holidays!

Embrace fall with festive, fun local events

Autumn Halloween pumpkins. Orange pumpkins over bright autumnal nature backgroundSo long summer and welcome autumn. It’s unofficially fall, which means our area has a variety of festive events on tap.

Coming up this weekend in Gallipolis, Ohio, is the 6th Annual Gallia County BBQ Festival. The event, hosted by the Gallia County Convention and Visitors Bureau, will take place Saturday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Gallipolis City Park and First Avenue/State Street. Admission as well as festival activities are free; however, attendees can purchase barbecue and sides from local vendors. In addition to tasty food, there will be face painting and inflatables for children.

In Meigs County Ohio, don’t miss the Racine Party in the Park, which kicks off this Thursday and runs through Saturday. The free event will place at Star Mill Park in Racine. Carnival rides, live music, a parade, car show, kiddie tractor pull and many other activities are on schedule.

The Annual Jackson Apple Festival returns Sept.17-21 in downtown Jackson, Ohio. As usual this area tradition will feature a great week filled with entertainment, music, food, parades, crafts, and competitions, including apple bobbing, of course. The Ohio University Marching 110 Drum Line will perform 9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18. And though you won’t find it on the schedule, we’re also told by festival organizers that on Wednesday the top-ranked cornhole player in the nation, Cody Henderson, will be stopping by for a friendly game and meet and greet with festival goers. If you want to get a jump start on Apple Festival fun, stop by our OVB Jackson Office to check out 2018 Little Miss Apple Festival Jadyn Dunkle’s display

In Meigs County, Ohio, hop on over to Pomeroy for the Sternwheel Regatta. The regatta kicks off Thursday, Sept. 19, with a special firetruck parade. In addition, the event features “Rally by the River,” which will include live entertainment as well as competitions and children’s activities.

Celebrate the Mothman legend in Point Pleasant, W.Va. Sept. 21-22. The 18th Annual Mothman Festival is always a hit as it draws visitors both locally and across the country. The event features a variety of entertainment and vendors. The Mothman 5K will get things started on Saturday, Sept. 21, at 8 a.m. in downtown Point Pleasant. Race check-in will take place 7 a.m. at the Mothman Museum. Mothman hayrides will return 7 p.m. that evening at the West Virginia State Farm Museum.

Gallipolis will host The Emancipation Celebration Weekend Sept. 21-22 at the Gallia County Junior Fairgrounds. This year’s keynote speaker is Ric Sheffield, professor of legal studies and sociology at Kenyon College. The celebration weekend also will host activities for kids, which will include an appearance from Paw Patrol characters.

In Huntington, W.Va., music enthusiasts should check out the 4th Annual Funktafest Saturday, Sept. 21 at the Ritter Park Amphitheater. The one-day musical festival runs from 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Musical styles ranging from top funk, jam and reggae will be showcased.

October brings more festival fun to the area starting with the West Virginia Pumpkin Festival in Milton. The event is slated for Oct. 3-5 and will take place at West Virginia Pumpkin Park. The festival, which began in 1986, is one of the largest fests in the state. More than 100 skilled artisans will display crafts and there will be a variety of exhibits and demonstrations, including blacksmithing, pottery making, quilting and wood working.

The Beaver Oktoberfest is back Oct. 4-6 in the village of Beaver, Ohio. Come out and celebrate the region’s German heritage. Rides, crafts, and great food abound during the weekend, all leading up to the Sunday Parade.

Fall fun continues in Point Pleasant with the Annual Battle Days Festival Oct. 4-6. The event features a variety of historical re-enactments and demonstrations. Activities will take place on Main Street and at Tu-Endie-Wei State Park. A parade is set for 11 a.m. Oct. 5. Also on tap Oct. 5-6 in Point Pleasant, is the Country Fall Festival. The event, which takes place at the West Virginia State Farm Museum, boasts a variety of fall-themed activities for the whole family to enjoy. From demonstrations to delicious apple butter making, this is an event that will surely get you in the autumn mood.

In Gallipolis, the River Rat Beer and Music Festival returns to the City Park Oct. 5. The festival, which runs from 11 a.m.-11 p.m., will feature an impressive slate of performing artists and craft beer lineup. Food vendors from around the Appalachian region also will be on site.

The Bob Evans Farm Festival will return for the 49th year Oct. 11-13. Open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., the festival is $5 for adults, while children ages 5 and under get in free. The event, which is a staple in Rio Grande, Ohio, is a great fall, family festival. From rides and crafts to festive food and demonstrations, the event is jam-packed. Live performances and shows are also on schedule. In addition, representatives from the Columbus Zoo will be in attendance to show six to eight animals. For a full schedule of events, visit www.bobevans.com.

Also during that weekend, check out the Bristol Village Fair, held Oct. 11-12 at Bristol Village in Waverly, Ohio. This free event features art and crafts ranging from handmade jewelry to toys to quilts. The fair is open Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.-noon.

On Oct. 26, the Harvest Fest/Tales in the Tavern event will take place in Point Pleasant at Krodel Park’s Fort Randolph. Historical re-enactments are scheduled from 4-8 p.m. Also Halloween enthusiasts won’t want to miss seeing the iconic Pumpkin House in Kenova, W.Va. Oct. 25-26. The unique house, which has gained national attention the past few years, is decorated with more than 3,000 carved pumpkins.

For more information on autumn events in your community, contact your area chamber of commerce or tourism center. Be sure to check back here next month as we keep you posted on area Halloween events. Remember to think Community First as you enjoy this lovely fall season.

Soak up summer fun at the fair

Summer brings us hot days, pool time, vacations, and barbeques. Another important aspect of our area summer? The county fair, of course! Locally, many fairs have already kicked off, but there are plenty more in store now through August.

2019 Jackson Scholar Pic

Check out our scholarship display at the Jackson Fair, featuring 2019 scholar Annalee Warrens. 

If you missed last week’s Lawrence and Madison County Fairs, plan to visit the Fayette and Jackson County Fairs, both of which are taking place this week. Each of these wonderful events boasts fun and entertainment for all ages.

While visiting the Jackson Fair also make sure to stop by our OVB 4-H Scholarship booth, which features 2019 scholar Annalee Warrens. A graduate of Jackson High School, Warrens plans to attend Ohio State University to become a vocational agriculture teacher. She is the daughter of Jered and Missy Warrens.

Other upcoming area fairs include:

  • Cabell County Fair (W.Va.) – July 22-27

Check out the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth featuring Cabell’s newest scholar, Morgan Christian. She is the daughter of Michael Christian and Carol DeBord. Christian is a graduate of Cabell Midland High School and plans to attend West Virginia University to study biology. Watch the current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation Friday, July 26 at 6:30 p.m.

  • Pike County Fair – July 29-Aug. 3

Pike County 4-H Scholars will be featured once again at the OVB 4-H Scholarship booth. Layne Moorman, our 2019 scholar, is the newest member of the OVB 4-H family. Moorman is the daughter of Michael and Stacy Moorman. She is a graduate of Piketon High School and plans to attend Ohio University to study chemistry. Watch Moorman and Pike’s current scholars receive their checks at the fair 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 29.

  • Gallia County Fair – July 29-Aug. 3

Don’t miss the Gallia OVB 4-H scholarship booth, featuring current scholars and 2019 recipient, Josie Jones. She is the daughter of Vernon and Jodi Jones. She recently graduated from River Valley High School and plans to attend Marshall University to pursue a career as a speech language pathologist. Watch Jones and current scholars receive their checks during a special presentation 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug 1.

  • Mason County Fair (W.Va.) – Aug. 5-10

Mason County’s 2019 scholar, Sarah Deem, will be featured on the OVB 4-H Scholarship display. Deem is the daughter of Deron and Melissa Deem. She is also the sister of 2016 scholar, Katherine. She is a graduate of Point Pleasant High School and plans to attend West Virginia University to study marketing and advertising/public relations. Watch current scholars receive their checks Tuesday, Aug. 6 prior to the lamb show.

  • Athens County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Scioto County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Ross County Fair – Aug. 5-10
  • Meigs County Fair – Aug. 12-17

Don’t miss the chance to check out OVB’s Meigs 4-H Scholarship booth. This year’s display features 2019 scholar Ciera Older. She is the daughter of Chris and Melissa Lambert. A recent graduate of Meigs High School, Older plans to attend Ohio University to study elementary education. Don’t miss the scholar check presentation, Sunday, Aug. 11 following the fair parade at 7:30 p.m.

For more information on fair events, visit your local fair’s website/Facebook page. Have a safe and fun fair season!

 

Soak up summer fun with local events

American flag with fireworks. Vector

Summer has unofficially arrived and is in full-swing with a variety of local events for all ages. Winter might have felt long and cold, but the warm, sunshiny days are here at last. While many folks take a summer vacation, there are plenty of community events to look forward to as well.

From family fun to fireworks and concerts, summer 2019 is shaping up to be a great one. With so many great activities on tap, it is certainly possible to soak up summer fun while not breaking the bank as the majority of events are either low-cost or free.

This weekend already boasts an action-packed schedule. In Point Pleasant, W.Va., Bikes, BBQ, & Bluegrass will take place Saturday, June 8. The event features bicycle tour rides of varying distances that traverse roads in Point Pleasant and Mason County as well as a BBQ competition. The BBQ competition will begin at noon on Main Street. Prize money will be awarded to winners. For more information on how to register for the competition, check out www.bikepointpleasant.org. In addition, bluegrass music will take center stage at the Point Pleasant Riverfront Park at 7 p.m. In the event of inclement weather, the concert will take place at the Point Pleasant Junior Senior High School Auditorium. For more information and to sign up for the bike rides, visit www.tristateracer.com.

Also taking place in Point Pleasant this weekend is the return of the Mayor’s Night Out concert series. The first concert is set for 8 p.m. Friday, June 7 at Riverfront Park. Concerts will take place every Friday through Aug. 30 at 8 p.m., with the exception of Friday, July 5 and Friday, Aug. 9. The concert line-up will feature various music styles, including rock, blues, country, folk, gospel, and current hits.

In Gallipolis, Ohio, the Cruise In & Car Show is set for Saturday, June 8 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. The event will take place at SFS Truck Sales, located at 2150 Eastern Ave. The show will feature a variety of classic cars on display.

Also in Gallipolis, the Hot Summer Nights concert series already kicked off and will continue through September. Concerts take place 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Pavilion, located on the grounds of the French Art Colony. The gates will open at 6 p.m. Admission is $5 per person or free to French Art Colony members. For a full schedule of performances, call 740-446-3834 or visit http://www.frenchartcolony.org.

In Huntington, W.Va., the Pullman Square Summer Concert Series provides another opportunity to relax with some fun tunes. The first concerts are held on the front lawn of Pullman. The first concert kicks off tonight at 7 p.m. Additional concerts are set for June 13, June 20, June 27, July 11, July 18, July 25, Aug. 1, Aug. 8, Aug. 15, Aug. 22 and Aug. 29. All concerts are free and guests are encouraged to bring their own blankets and camp chairs.

Saturday KidsArt will also take place in Huntington on Saturday, June 8 from 1-3 p.m. at the Huntington Museum of Art. The event is free. Younger children must be accompanied by a guardian. For more information, call 304-529-2701.

In Pomeroy, Ohio, the 10th anniversary event of the Kickin’ Summer Bash will take place June 14-15 at the Levee. The event will feature a variety of activities and entertainment, including a Cruise in Car Show on Friday, June 14. Rockin’ Reggie music also will take place from 4-7 p.m. On Saturday, June 15 many kids’ activities are scheduled, including face painting, a treasure hunt and a scavenger hunt. There will be bounce houses as well. All of the kids’ activities are free. For more information, check out the Kickin’ Summer Bash Facebook page.

On June 28-29, history will come to life with Liberty Days. The event will take place from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Point Pleasant’s Fort Randolph, located within Krodel Park. Typically, Fort Randolph events showcase period demonstrations featuring historical reenactors.

July will kick off in patriotic fashion with several Independence Day events. The 54th Annual Gallipolis River Recreation Festival will take place July 3-4 at the City Park.  On Wednesday, July 3 the opening ceremony is set for noon, however gospel music and kids’ inflatables open at 10 a.m. KidZone Activities will also take place from 2-6 p.m. Thursday’s July 4 schedule kicks off with the Baby Tot Sparkler Contest as well as the Rubber Ducky Race on the Riverfront at 9 a.m. The 66th Annual Gallipolis Rotary Mile will take place at 11:30 a.m. with the parade to follow at noon. Fireworks will wrap up festivities at 10 p.m.

In Point Pleasant, the Inaugural Liberty Fest will celebrate Independence Day. The event will feature a variety of activities, including a patriotic parade at 5:30 p.m. on Main St. Activities continue on Main St. and Riverfront Park from 6-10 p.m., with fireworks set to close out the evening. Mason and New Haven, W.Va. have Independence Day entertainment on tap as well, including the Fourth of July Parade, which is slated for 11 a.m. in New Haven.

Jackson, Ohio’s Freedom Festival is once again on tap for Independence Day. While a full schedule of events wasn’t provided as of press time, the event’s 23rd Annual Jackson County Freedom Festival 5K Run and Walk is now open for registration at http://www.tristateracer.com. The event will take place 9 a.m. at Manpower Park.

For more information regarding your community’s Fourth of July events, please contact your local chamber or council.

You won’t want to miss Rhythm on the River, slated for July 5, 12 and 19 in Pomeroy. The event is celebrating its 20th year and will once again showcase free live music at the Riverfront. The Big Bend Blues Bash also will take place in Pomeroy July 26-27. A full schedule of performers will be released later this summer.

The 2nd 5K Ruck Walk/Run, sponsored by OVB, will take place 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6 at the Haskins Park Shelter. Online registration is encouraged and can be done via runsignup.com/Race/OH/Gallipolis/TheOhioValleyBank5KRuckWalk. Same day registration will take place at 8 a.m. prior to the race. Participants are encouraged to bring a ruck sack to commemorate soldiers who carry a physical or emotional burden daily. Event proceeds will benefit local VA clinics.

Other ways to seek out summer fun locally includes visiting area museums, parks and libraries. The Bossard Memorial Library in Gallipolis, for example, boasts a jam-packed schedule of children’s programs this summer. The library also hosts many events for adults. Continue to check with your local chamber our tourism center to see if any other events are taking place in your community.

In addition to the various festivals, many of our area’s fairs are scheduled to take place this summer. The fairs are a great way to enjoy music and rides as well as support our area 4-H youth. Check back soon for more information on upcoming area fairs.

Have a safe and happy summer!

Students react to OVB shareholders meeting

2019 Annual Meeting reactions

Ohio Valley Banc Corp. welcomed students from South Gallia High School and River Valley High School at their annual shareholder’s meeting.

Ohio Valley Banc Corp. recently held their annual shareholder’s meeting. Community was once again a main focus of this year’s event. As future leaders of our community, this year’s meeting also welcomed students from South Gallia High School and River Valley High School.

Julia Nutter, a recent graduate of River Valley High School, has attended the shareholder’s meeting for the past three years. While she has always been interested in the business aspect, she said that she really enjoyed learning about OVB’s Community First efforts.

“It’s interesting to see how when the bank is successful, the community is successful too,” she said.

Michelle Alderman, a personal finance teacher at River Valley High School, also attended the meeting with Nutter. She described the event as a great opportunity for their students to learn more about their local bank and how it operates.

“All semester long they have been learning about and applying financial literacy skills. Some students even open accounts at OVB and by attending the annual meeting they get to see how the topics they have learned are applied in a real world setting. They learn how their local bank works to be involved and is committed to their local community,” Alderman said. “I always enjoy learning about how OVB is working to improve our local community and putting money back into the counties they serve.”

Jeff Fowler, South Gallia High School American history teacher, echoed Alderman’s thoughts.

“This gives (students) a look at real world business operations at the local and regional level in the banking industry, which reflects governance of any corporation,” he said. “This allows them to see how active a local bank is in their local community not in the sense of just accounts but in the sense of economic growth.”

Chad Bostic, a recent graduate of South Gallia High School, described the event as an opportunity to learn more about the business of bank operations.

“I learned about the personnel of the bank and how the corporation operates itself,” Bostic said. He added that he also enjoyed learning about OVB’s plans for their future and how it will impact the community.

Madison Graves, South Gallia High School sophomore, enjoyed the financial aspect of the shareholders meeting. She said she is interested in accounting and that she enjoyed seeing how the bank makes money.

“I learned all the finances of the bank and thought it was interesting how it works,” she said. “I thought learning about the bank’s community involvement was neat. I never really thought about it before and it makes a lot of sense in how (OVB) views the community.”

Both Fowler and Alderman said they were pleased to bring students to the shareholder’s meeting once again and that they hope to continue doing so in the future. River Valley High School and South Gallia High School are also participating schools in OVB’s BANKit program. For more information on that as well as other financial education programs, contact OVB Financial Literacy Leader Hope Roush at hdroush@ovbc.com.